>Congrats ARR

>Thank you god!! 

At last, Oscars for India…
Love the music and Believe in Indians.
JAI HO!!!!
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>Brand Logos and its History.

>In Marketing, it is very important to choose the Brand elements such as Names, URLs, Logo, Symbol, Characteristics, Packaging. These are things which add value to your Brand Equity.

So I found that these following Brands have some of the most exciting and interesting Brand Logo.
Here are some of them:
Starbucks


Starbucks Corporation is a coffeehouse chain based in the United States. Named after a character in the novel Moby Dick, it is the largest coffeehouse company in the world, with 7521 self-operated and 5647 licensed stores in 39 countries. The current company logo, modeled after a 15th century Norse woodcut, is a mixoparthenos, or “twin-tailed mermaid, or siren as she’s known in Greek mythology. The company and the logo have an interesting history. As you can see on the above pictures!!!

ADDIDAS

The three stripes of Adidas can be seen everywhere. They are on the shoes, they are on the jerseys of your favorite football team, they are on T-shirts, and on many more things. Adolf-Adi-Dassler founded Adidas in 1949 in Herzogenaurach, Germany along with his brother Rudolf (Who later founded rival sportswear maker Puma). The three stripes logo was created by Adi Dassler himself. Since then the stripes have become a symbol of comfort, durability and toughness.


The three stripes which are shaped like mountain signify the challenges faced by the athletes. Chances are that it was inspired by the side view of a shoe with a lace. The triangular shape of the logo looks like a shoe while the white space between stripes may signify shoelace. 

The stripes have become so much of a part of Adidas’ identity that they have adapted different variations of it for their various business units. In 1971 Adidas came out with a Trefoil Logo which became its corporate identity for the next few years.

Today the company has three different versions of the logo for its three different businesses. The Modern Performance logo, The Classic Trefoil logo and the Y-3 logo.


WAL-MART


Sam Walton names his new stores WALMART. The Walmart name was presented in just about any font/style available to the printer.


                                                                                          1962-1964

Also known as the “Frontier Font Logo,” this was the first official and consistently used logo.


1964 – 1981


The Discount City mark was used in print advertising, on the uniforms/smocks, in-store signing, and other things. However, it was never used as building signage or in an annual report.

1968-1981
The logo was updated again in 1981.         

                                                                                         1981 – 1992


The star was adopted as an update to the existing logo in early 1992.

                                                                                           1992-2008

The Latest Logo adapted by Wal Mart, USA 

Brand Logos and its History.

In Marketing, it is very important to choose the Brand elements such as Names, URLs, Logo, Symbol, Characteristics, Packaging. These are things which add value to your Brand Equity.

So I found that these following Brands have some of the most exciting and interesting Brand Logo.
Here are some of them:
Starbucks


Starbucks Corporation is a coffeehouse chain based in the United States. Named after a character in the novel Moby Dick, it is the largest coffeehouse company in the world, with 7521 self-operated and 5647 licensed stores in 39 countries. The current company logo, modeled after a 15th century Norse woodcut, is a mixoparthenos, or “twin-tailed mermaid, or siren as she’s known in Greek mythology. The company and the logo have an interesting history. As you can see on the above pictures!!!

ADDIDAS

The three stripes of Adidas can be seen everywhere. They are on the shoes, they are on the jerseys of your favorite football team, they are on T-shirts, and on many more things. Adolf-Adi-Dassler founded Adidas in 1949 in Herzogenaurach, Germany along with his brother Rudolf (Who later founded rival sportswear maker Puma). The three stripes logo was created by Adi Dassler himself. Since then the stripes have become a symbol of comfort, durability and toughness.


The three stripes which are shaped like mountain signify the challenges faced by the athletes. Chances are that it was inspired by the side view of a shoe with a lace. The triangular shape of the logo looks like a shoe while the white space between stripes may signify shoelace. 

The stripes have become so much of a part of Adidas’ identity that they have adapted different variations of it for their various business units. In 1971 Adidas came out with a Trefoil Logo which became its corporate identity for the next few years.

Today the company has three different versions of the logo for its three different businesses. The Modern Performance logo, The Classic Trefoil logo and the Y-3 logo.


WAL-MART


Sam Walton names his new stores WALMART. The Walmart name was presented in just about any font/style available to the printer.


                                                                                          1962-1964

Also known as the “Frontier Font Logo,” this was the first official and consistently used logo.


1964 – 1981


The Discount City mark was used in print advertising, on the uniforms/smocks, in-store signing, and other things. However, it was never used as building signage or in an annual report.

1968-1981
The logo was updated again in 1981.         

                                                                                         1981 – 1992


The star was adopted as an update to the existing logo in early 1992.

                                                                                           1992-2008

The Latest Logo adapted by Wal Mart, USA 

>Creative Briefing Format

>

Exceptionally good creative is a result of extremely well-thought out strategy. And the sun rises in the east. Nothing new, I admit, but good creative development process begins with a well-written creative brief. How to write a good creative brief is the subject of this edition.

Advertising professionals, excuse me please. You guys probably know how to write good briefs. But for those who wish to access a good template here is the format from one of world’s most respected ad agencies – BBDO. Here goes it.

Assignment: The job on hand

– Campaign / Single ad
– TV commercial – Length
– Print ad – Size, Colour
– Newspaper or magazine
– Outdoor, Promotion, Radio, Integrated Campaign
– What do we have to do, what’s the budget, and when do we have to do it by

Include relevant data

Target: For whom our brand will be a viable alternative

– Not just demographics – psychographics
– What are they like as human beings?
– What are their hopes, fears, and ambitions?
– What do they expect from the category?
– How do they use it?
– What needs do they have that aren’t being met?

Be as informative and as insightful as possible

Competitive Frame: Who is our competition?

-What are they saying?
– What is the source of business?
– What will the consumer do or buy if they don’t buy us?

Not just a list of brands – could include habits and attitudes

Consumer Belief: The deeply held perceptions and feelings

– What is the single most important thing our prospects believe or feel about our brand or the category?

What is it that the advertising must change or reinforce?

Marketing Objective: The things that we are aiming for

Be as specific and clear-cut as possible.

Advertising Objective: What we want to make happen due to advertising

– Raise awareness
– Put on list
– Encourage trial
– Repeat purchase
– Change perceptions
– Reconsider our brand
– Use it more often
– Use in a new way
– Remain satisfied

Be specific, again.

Key Selling Message: The one thing we want to tell them

– In the light of the Consumer Belief in the defined Competitive Frame, what is the single-minded promise we will make to the defined Target that will persuade them to act in the way that will achieve the Advertising Objective?
– What do we want them to think, feel or believe as a result of the Advertising?

What do we have to have an idea about?

Support: Relevant reasons why we can make the promise

– Competitive physical or perceptual advantages
– Not just a list of features, or of all the brand’s good points

The reason to believe our claims.

Brand Personality: Aspect of personality that the ad must reflect

– A brief, vivid description
– Not just a list of adjectives

Preferably, describable by one word or phrase.

Budget / Timing: The budget for the whole exercise

What are the time frames?

Mandatory Inclusions: The musts or must nots be included in the ad

– Legal restrictions, logo usage, campaign themes
– The fewer the better

None, if possible!

Criteria for Evaluation: Measurable action points

The parameters by which the creative would be evaluated.

Creative Briefing Format

Exceptionally good creative is a result of extremely well-thought out strategy. And the sun rises in the east. Nothing new, I admit, but good creative development process begins with a well-written creative brief. How to write a good creative brief is the subject of this edition.

Advertising professionals, excuse me please. You guys probably know how to write good briefs. But for those who wish to access a good template here is the format from one of world’s most respected ad agencies – BBDO. Here goes it.

Assignment: The job on hand

– Campaign / Single ad
– TV commercial – Length
– Print ad – Size, Colour
– Newspaper or magazine
– Outdoor, Promotion, Radio, Integrated Campaign
– What do we have to do, what’s the budget, and when do we have to do it by

Include relevant data

Target: For whom our brand will be a viable alternative

– Not just demographics – psychographics
– What are they like as human beings?
– What are their hopes, fears, and ambitions?
– What do they expect from the category?
– How do they use it?
– What needs do they have that aren’t being met?

Be as informative and as insightful as possible

Competitive Frame: Who is our competition?

-What are they saying?
– What is the source of business?
– What will the consumer do or buy if they don’t buy us?

Not just a list of brands – could include habits and attitudes

Consumer Belief: The deeply held perceptions and feelings

– What is the single most important thing our prospects believe or feel about our brand or the category?

What is it that the advertising must change or reinforce?

Marketing Objective: The things that we are aiming for

Be as specific and clear-cut as possible.

Advertising Objective: What we want to make happen due to advertising

– Raise awareness
– Put on list
– Encourage trial
– Repeat purchase
– Change perceptions
– Reconsider our brand
– Use it more often
– Use in a new way
– Remain satisfied

Be specific, again.

Key Selling Message: The one thing we want to tell them

– In the light of the Consumer Belief in the defined Competitive Frame, what is the single-minded promise we will make to the defined Target that will persuade them to act in the way that will achieve the Advertising Objective?
– What do we want them to think, feel or believe as a result of the Advertising?

What do we have to have an idea about?

Support: Relevant reasons why we can make the promise

– Competitive physical or perceptual advantages
– Not just a list of features, or of all the brand’s good points

The reason to believe our claims.

Brand Personality: Aspect of personality that the ad must reflect

– A brief, vivid description
– Not just a list of adjectives

Preferably, describable by one word or phrase.

Budget / Timing: The budget for the whole exercise

What are the time frames?

Mandatory Inclusions: The musts or must nots be included in the ad

– Legal restrictions, logo usage, campaign themes
– The fewer the better

None, if possible!

Criteria for Evaluation: Measurable action points

The parameters by which the creative would be evaluated.

>Good news!!

>Hey hi all, 

I’ve got some good news.. I’ve been in the top 10 of my class and I was also selected for this Wealth management program in Delhi conducted by NUS-National University of Singapore. But I turned it down becoz I’m not in Finance and definitely not planning to take up the same.. 
So I would have to do Internship in Marketing or HR… Lets hope I do that well.